Estate Planning

Retirement Planning and Saving

Many Americans are saving nothing or very little in their day to day lives for retirement. While the unemployment rate has previously been  low and wages are seeing an increase the American worker is not saving enough of their income which will inevitably lead to short falls of operational cash during an unexpected crisis and in their retirement years further down the road. (https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/15/bankrate-65-percent-of-americans-save-little-or-nothing.html)

Bankrate maintains that half of all Americans will not be able to maintain their standard of living once they have stopped working. GoBankingRates corroborates these findings citing that over forty percent of Americans have less than $10,000 dollars saved for their retirement. These statistics point to a dismal retirement future for nearly half of all Americans.

This doesn’t have to be your future. It doesn’t matter how little you currently save. You don’t have to become the horror story of retiring and meeting financial ruin like so many do. What matters is that you change the trajectory of your retirement life by proactively examining how you are spending and saving. The sooner you begin the better your chances of success.

The first and most important strategy to implement is learning to live beneath your means. That translates into saving money: probably more than you currently do. Saving money is an underestimated survival skill. To save begin by tracking your spending habits for thirty days. Once you have the data create a realistic and doable budget. Fluid expenditures like groceries, eating out, clothing, gasoline and auto maintenance need to have a set monthly budget. Create a simple two columned sheet of paper with budgeted and actual expenditures to monitor your progress. Typical categories where you can reduce expenditures include; cable packages, phone plans, groceries, entertainment costs, gym memberships, clothing and dining out. Start asking yourself over and over “Is this a need or a want?” and if it is a need, how can you make the cost lower. The game is how much money you can save, not spend.

Consolidate your non essential debt and pay it off, completely. Make it a primary goal to get out of debt. Stop being a debt slave. In the credit card industry there is an insider term used for people who fully pay their credit cards off each month. Guess what it is? It is a deadbeat. Companies cannot make money off of you if you stop becoming a slave to debt. If you can’t afford it then find a way to live without it.

Double check your insurance rates on your car, homeowner, and health. Do not purchase flight insurance, extended warranties, and disease insurance. Check this site for fifteen insurance policies you don’t need. (https://www.investopedia.com/insurance/insurance-policies-you-dont-need/). Get rid of the policy all together or find wiggle room for reduced premiums or get a more competitive provider to save money.

Get rid of automatic payments attached to your banking accounts. Most people can eliminate expenditures they forgot they are even locked into. This also forces you to take control of your bill/payment cycles. Being involved in the day to day of bill payment keeps you far more aware of your financial situation and keeps your mind active.

Consider downsizing your home. If you are in a two story house it is inevitable that one day you will not be able to climb those stairs. A one story home or a first floor condo or apartment can help you purge your life of ‘stuff’ you no longer need. Some of those things can be sold and the proceeds can be saved. Any profit left over from downsizing immediately goes into savings or a financial investment vehicle to provide and protect your senior years.

These are some but not all of the ways it is possible to change your savings habits. Guidance from a trusted professional is key to the pathway of success because there will always be roadblocks and setbacks that you must make adjustments for.  Structuring a legal plan in connection with a retirement plan can provide added protection and allow you to enjoy retirement more thoroughly.

Contact our office today and schedule an appointment to discuss how we can help you with your planning. Please contact our Reno office by calling us at (775) 853-5700.

Elder Law

The Benefit of an Elder Law Attorney

An elder law attorney specializes as a legal advocate for aging adults and their loved ones. Elder law encompasses a wide range of legal matters affecting an older or disabled person. Issues related to guardianship, retirement, health care including advance directives, long term care planning, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, and other relevant matters to aging all fall under the umbrella of elder law.

An older family member who legally prepares for their aging process helps their family members by addressing day to day issues that affect their actual care through proper legal documentation should the senior become incapacitated. Seniors often falsely assume that a close family member, including a spouse, will automatically be able to make decisions on their behalf if something goes wrong with their finances or health. Postponing legal document preparation through an elder attorney generally winds up being more problematic and expensive to a senior’s estate and wellness.

Many seniors find making legal preparations uncomfortable at first, as the task forces them to confront and assess their mortality. Further into the process, many aging adults experience relief, having removed the fear of the unknown of aging to the best of their ability. Legal preparation can keep a senior from health or financial ruin if they become incapable of making informed decisions regarding these matters. In the absence of legal documents, their family is left with the expensive and time-consuming process of petitioning the courts for legal authority to act on their loved one’s behalf – referred to as establishing a guardianship. By planning early and making sure the correct legal documents are prepared stress on the senior and the senior’s loved ones is greatly reduced.

Personal choices regarding end of life care and the disposition of assets and property outlined in legal documentation guarantees that your wishes will be respected by law. This documentation is especially important for seniors when a family member might seek control over the process, whether moral or self-serving, to follow their whims when handling your wellbeing when you are most vulnerable. Besides adhering to your expressed wishes, having your choices documented relieves family members from guessing what you want.

When preparing for your aging process, seek out a well-regarded attorney who specializes in elder law. While many general practice attorneys may have some experience with elder law topics, regulations are ever-changing and complex. It is best to find an attorney who specializes in elder law so that you get the best and most up-to-date advice.

Proactively address your aging process with a qualified elder attorney to ensure your wishes are carried out now and in the future, regardless of what happens with your health. Both you and your loved ones will garner invaluable peace of mind knowing that your wishes are known and legally documented. We would be happy to help you with your planning, and we look forward to hearing from you. Please don’t hesitate to contact our Reno office by calling us at (775) 853-5700.

Elder Law, Elder Living

Seniors Stay Socially Engaged While Socially Distancing with the help of Technology

We have come to know that successful, healthy aging is contingent upon connection to those around us. The opportunities for people to laugh, move, and learn together is foundational to aging success. Enter the coronavirus pandemic to change all of that. Now aging Americans must stay socially engaged while maintaining a physical distance. This issue touches us all from senior wellness professionals, medical staff, families, inter-resident connections, and those aging in place at home and alone. The internet of things, and the virtual links it creates, is a great solution to implement in a socially distanced, troubling pandemic world.

Virtual technology tools were becoming more ubiquitous before the coronavirus. Yet, the need for emotional well-being as the especially vulnerable aging population of America became isolated was the accelerant solution to address the problem. Fitness classes ranging from tai chi to yoga and other forms of movement became available in droves of senior online classes. Connecting with family members or health professionals through telemedicine also became crucial as regular visitations and routine medical appointments became impossible.

Virtual tools provide a great advantage for social distancing as no meeting space is required. Senior interaction with tech tools has brought new learning and skills opportunities, providing a sense of connection, purpose, and pride. Older adults share their newfound prowess in video messages, multi online person chats, and more. Grandparents and grandchildren find common ground in a technological world, and grateful parents/adult children are happy for the means to address the social isolation problem and create stronger inter-generational family ties.

Beyond the connection of friends and family, technology brings email, instant messaging, social media sites, brain games, wellness bingo cards, music, even virtual cruises with daily ports of call to keep seniors connected in isolation. Many aging adults associate full-length feature films with a movie theater and do not realize they can watch nearly anything they want via streaming services, 24 hours a day, whenever they choose.

While the internet and these technology tools provide virtual interaction and entertainment, not every senior who needs it can afford a tablet computer or laptop. Many communities are holding campaigns to raise funds for those in need of these digital devices. Nursing homes can receive a stipend from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) through the Civil Monetary Penalty (CMP) fund. Funding through CMP provides communication aids such as tablet devices and webcams that enable virtual visits. However, each facility has a limit of $3,000 to ensure a balance in distributing CMP funds. Because these items may be shared among negative COVID-19 residents, it is critical to avoid entering highly personal information into device applications or programs. Shared tablets are not a good way to check bank accounts, shop online, or have your senior pay bills.

Be wary of too much learning too quickly for a senior. Don’t overwhelm the aging adult with the technology, rather focus on what it provides. Slowly introduce different aspects of the technology and be certain the senior has a firm understanding of how to repeat the process to get online or risk creating frustration. Also, educate them that even though they can Skype, Zoom, et al. with others does not mean their loved ones or friends will be available at all times for them. Set a schedule for meaningful connections, managing their expectations to keep them from cycles of disappointment. Share successes, experiences, even failures with residential staff, other family members, and residents. Find out what works the best overall. Keep the strategy simple for the best results.

Be aware that seniors without strong social connections before covid-19 may feel incredibly left out. The technology connecting people doesn’t work if there is no one to communicate with on the other end of the virtual line. Residents without existing social networks typically rely on the now non-existent shared dining room and community events for interaction, and they may now be left behind. These residents need more assistance in learning how to join online classes and interactive communities that share like interests. Senior Americans unfamiliar with the internet of things do not understand the scope of what is available to them. CMS Administrator Seema Verma states, “While we must remain steadfast in our fight to shield nursing home residents from this virus, it is becoming clear that prolonged isolation and separation from family is also taking a deadly toll on our aging loved ones.”  Help your loved one to leverage digital technology and the internet to stay connected during the coronavirus pandemic. There is still hope and human connection available, and vulnerable and isolated seniors are in desperate need of both.

If you have questions or would like to discuss your personal situation, please don’t hesitate to contact us. Please contact our Reno office by calling us at (775) 853-5700.

Uncategorized

A Final Retirement Account Distribution Must Still Be Made After Death

Federal law requires that beginning on April 1 of the year after you reach age 70 1/2, you must begin withdrawing a minimum amount from your non-Roth individual retirement account (IRA) or 401(k) accounts. These withdrawals are called required minimum distributions (RMDs).

But what if you die after age 70 1/2 and before all the account funds have been distributed? In the eyes of the law, death is no excuse not to take RMDs from an IRA or 401(k). Your heirs must take the final RMD before they can take control of the account.  

The rules for inheriting an IRA as a spouse are different than the rules for a non-spouse beneficiary, but regardless of who is inheriting the IRA, the heir must take the RMD for the year the account owner died. The full RMD must be taken by December 31 in the year the account owner died, even if he or she died at the beginning of the year. To take the RMD, beneficiaries must contact the custodian of the account and submit a death certificate. If the account owner died before he or she was required to begin distributions, then the beneficiaries do not need to take an RMD. 

The money from the RMD will go directly to the beneficiary listed on the account, not the estate. That means it will be taxable income for the beneficiary. If there is more than one beneficiary, it will be split evenly. 

To find out the best way to deal with an inherited IRA, contact an elder law attorney. To find one near you, go here: https://www.elderlawanswers.com/elder-law-attorneys